The Principality’s first public garden opened in 1816. Built on an abandoned plot, it was originally meant as a way of providing work to residents when Monaco was struck by famine.

Originally, the Saint-Martin gardens were a typically Mediterranean garden, dotted with pine forests, holm oaks, myrtles, pistachio trees… Later, exotic species acclimatised to the site, were added. Today, its winding and steep paths follow the rocky slope and offer many resting places for walkers. In the centre of the garden, visitors can also enjoy a refreshing break by the pool.

Concealed at the bottom of the road, between the Oceanographic Museum and the Cathedral, this green setting offers walkers as many surprises as exceptional views of the “Big Blue”. Between exceptional plants and sculptures, harmony reigns in this site combining art and botany. Moreover, as the rock juts out opposite the Mediterranean, visitors can discover a bronze statue of Prince Albert I “The Navigator Prince”, created by the artist Francois Cogne.