Located halfway between the Prince’s Palace and Monaco’s Cathedral, this building is unfortunately not open to the public. That being said, it is well worth making a short detour to admire the building’s round structure and its eclectic mix of architectural styles.

The building is made of sea tuff, a grey and porous stone, similar to what the ramparts of Monaco are made of. This stone is compomised of many smaller stones and sometimes mollusc shells. In addition, the bust of Sovereign Honoré II dating from 1568 is on one of the facades of the Palace.

The Directorate of Judicial Services is the Monégasque Department of Justice. Originally, it was governed by an Ordinance of 9 March 1918, but today it is governed by Law n. 1.398 of 24/06/2013 relating to judiciary administration and organisation.

In other words, it is an administration independent of the Prince’s Government, headed by the Director of Judicial Services. In 2021, the latter position was appointed to Mr Robert Gelli. No matter who occupies this role, their mission will remain the same: ensure the proper administration of justice. As such, they have, in the field of judicial administration, powers comparable to those given to the Minister of State for the general administration of the country.