A world without waste. The Energy Transition Mission (MTE) is working towards this goal in the Principality. The aim is to encourage people to make their everyday behaviours more environmentally friendly, be that through recycling or consuming less single-use products.

The waste produced in the Principality currently accounts for a third of Monaco’s CO2 emissions: a figure that needs to be reduced. It is hoped that as part of the Energy Transition Mission, small efforts on the part of individuals will contribute to an overall reduction in the emissions and pollution that are negatively impacting the planet’s biodiversity and accelerating global warming.

Recycling and re-using different household objects is one way to achieve this, as well as making an effort to find alternatives to single-use plastics. A sort of circular economy is to be created, transforming waste products into more useful objects, giving them a new lease of life to optimise sustainability.

Recycling food waste and even our hair

Cutting down on packaging, using biodegradable coffee pods, recycling our hair and even turning leftover food into chicken feed! There are so many innovative solutions and creative suggestions being put forward by shopkeepers, restaurants and museums in Monaco.

Until Sunday 2 May, you have the chance to vote for the best green initiative in Monaco, aimed at reducing waste in the Principality. How can you do this? Simply sign the National Energy Transition Pact and by signing the Commitment Charter you will be able to cast your vote online for one of the 19 initiatives listed.

Once voting closes, three winners will be crowned. “We recommend voting for the most innovative projects, those that will reduce waste the most, have a positive effect on the economy and that the majority of people in Monaco will be able to implement in their lives,” explained Isabelle Curau-Bloch, Head of the Energy Transition Mission, during an interview with news channel Monaco Info.

For more information, visit Coach Carbone du Pacte.

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