The government in Monaco has just announced that Covid-19 safety measures will be easing in the Principality. The more relaxed rules will come into effect on Monday 19 April.

Curfew brought forward to 9pm and restaurants open in the evenings, these are the new measures announced by the Prince’s government, as the situation in the Principality has begun to improve. However, Pierre Dartout, Minister of State, warned that “today we are seeing our hard work pay off, but it is not time to celebrate just yet, we have been fighting this war for over a year now.” As the pandemic evolves these measures will too, as authorities will review them every two weeks.

To justify the easing of these restrictions, the government has reminded the public that 32% of the population in Monaco has already been vaccinated. Not only this, but the incidence rate, test positivity rate and the number of patients in hospital, or under the care of the home follow-up centre, are all low enough to warrant these changes.

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A staged reopening

The curfew, currently in place until Monday 3 May, will now last from 9pm until 6am. Restaurants have also received good news, as they are now allowed to stay open until 9.30pm, but must only serve local residents and hotel guests. Anyone dining past 9pm will be eligible for a curfew exemption document, allowing them to make it home before 10pm. In addition, once schools go back on the 26 April, outdoor sport can resume.

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Limited spectators for Historic Grand Prix

Although tickets for the Monaco Grand Prix went on sale a few days ago, organisers had still not announced which Covid safety measures would be in place. For the moment, it has simply been decided that the first day of the Historic Grand Prix will take place behind closed doors and for the last two days, only 6,500 people will be allowed to attend the event.

Only local residents and workers as well as hotel guests in Monaco are allowed to buy tickets, which will be sold “at reduced prices”. The government is waiting to see how well this new approach works before making any decisions about the ePrix and Grand Prix.